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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)
sign of americans who had escaped from tehran. a happy welcome. at the ceremony, canada and canadians were cheered along with americans. many people including the returnees were wearing olive branches on their lapels. there was concern somebody might say something that would make the aranian jailers angry at the people still held in iran. explaining how the escapees had hid first in the homes of friends then took refuge at the canadian embassy. >> it is hard to express how happy we are, they made us feel as part of our family especially at times during christmas when our spirits really needed the boost. we thank them for their brave support. >> reporter: then he made a plea for the 53 still in prison. >> we must not and will not forget them. >> late this afternoon the six american returnees made a visit with the president. the president was delighted. >> these are six brave americans. that knew that american people loved them but didn't know how much until they got back. >> still to come on a second look the day the hostages were freed just as a new american president was sworn in. >
to my source, tehran did not announce it. ask that question of yourself. why did tehran not take this opportunity to pop off? >> why didn't they? >> because they did not want to intervene in the re-election of president obama who's involved in secret negotiations with the supreme leader to give him everything he wants. >> this has a benghazi feel to it, john, and it's only a one-week cover-up. this has a benghazi feel to it. >> very nice, larry, but tehran is in on it this time. >> policy is falling apart. they don't want to tell anyone about it. >> tehran is in on the benghazi cover-up. two cannot dance. they chose not to dance. >> two supreme leaders here. do you seriously believe there are going to be secret talks to stop the iranian enrichment for their nuclear weapons? you really believe this? does our supreme leader really believe it's going to have any impact? >> more, larry. there are negotiations for the president to travel to tehran in a deal much like nixon went to beijing. that is on the table. that's part of the negotiations. >> problem for tehran, i've never heard t
and president obama. the regime in tehran doesn't fear president obama. they believe he is not a credible individual. they believe that president obama is someone who gives concessions to iran, and, by the way, president obama is someone who is not going to use military force against iran. governor romney on other hand, considered a new ronald reagan. they fear him. they believe with governor romney in the white house --. melissa: really? what makes you think they're afraid of governor romney? >> i think that his performance in the third presidential debate has made the leadership in tehran realize they are facing a new type of individual who is ready to stand very, very firmly by u.s. allies, particularly israel. and someone who is very different by nature with, compared with president obama. melissa: so what do you think he would do on day one that would stop iran in its tracks? >> he has himself said that he is ready to tough inch the sanctions which are already in place. and, i also believe that it would send sufficient signals to tehran they need to capitulate their nuclear program.
. of course the regime in tehran still stands today for a variety of reasons. one of time to get in to. but that was an indication in 2009 that the islamic republic was in trouble and this behavior demonstrated that it? legitimacy in iran and across the region. so the 2009 demonstrations really damaged the islamic republic's credential by the force of resistance and supported the downtrodden region. the arab spring has made things a lot worse for the islamic republic, namely due to tehran support for the bishara al-assad regime is area. iran has welcomed other uprisings in the region come at you in asia, because they saw uprisings as really hurting u.s. power influences in the regions, specifically the leadership of the islamic republic has been waiting for hosni mubarak to be overthrown for decades. he was one of their prime enemies in the region, competitor and influence in the region. the iranian leadership or trade the uprising as a victory. ayatollah khomeini, the leader of iran has claimed the arabs were inspired by the own islamic revolution in 1979. interestingly, the head of g
through persia through the mountains picked up by a the russians by tehran. and a much smaller percentage were involved with trading missions with there and and saudi arabia. but our 60,000 uniformed troops left the supply delivery business to rush up. those small numbers of the advisers stuck around for decades and that is what represented america pez influence as a prolonged role in the gulf. >>host: i always think of the british of involvement in the middle east. how did they step back? >>guest: with regard to the gulf of brits arrived in the 1800 representing their quest to provide order on the flanks to the imperial interest of india. the southern coast of the gulf was called the piru coast. constantly feuding tribes would feud with one another spilling out of the seaboard approach to in the and resulted in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the
in tehran. we are spending a lot of time, talking about benghazi. i am curious, three decades have passed, about our policies at work, in the middle-east and where we are today? >> li think it shows that if you abandon a position of strength in the region, you leave yourself vulnerable. you know, let's not forget the carter administration's weakness demonstrated not only in the hostage taking in tehran but ine lack of response to our embass neback stan being burned, our ambassador in afghanistan being assassinated in 1979. i very much fear we are going through the same situation and that the response or lack of response by the administration unfortunately formal shadows more danger. that's a policy, which if continued the next four years, will leave america's special at risk and leave our friends and allies in the middle-east very much at risk. >> i am going to be speaking to two men taken hostage that day and it's something we will talk a lot about on this program. we appreciate your insight. thank you. >> thank you. >> in the northeast, frustration continues to mount, less than a week a
to iran through the state department and the swiss delegation that represents the u.s. inside tehran. megyn: the class fried mission is now over? it's only a week later. >> reporter: the reason this came out is because of news reports. cnn broke the story moments ago and the pentagon was forced to react to it in the briefing a few minutes ago. the reason they did not talk about this or reveal information on it last week is the drone reportedly was flying on a classified mission. the pentagon claim the drone did not cross into iranian air space. about it was on a classified mission, megyn. megyn: if you wouldn't mind sticking around for us. in about five minutes we got ambassador bolton to come back. he was here with us last hour. he's on his way back to the studios. we may have some more questions we could ask you. i would appreciate it. stand by. we'll get this political panel in. but we are going back to bolton and gender on this breaking news in moments. there are new questions about the 2012 election results and america's shifting demographics. the exit polls and voter surveys sh
traditionally dressed, a couple in the mountains outside tehran, two young women at a highway rest stop. >> the image we receive of iran -- i just wanted to check it out for myself in my own subjective way. >> she spent three weeks traveling through iran in september, using her camera lens to determine how much a daily life is -- how much daily life is affected by their oppressive rule. her photographs captured iranians enjoying a picnic, a hugely popular activity in the country. under closer inspection, the pictures reveal the many ways in which people subvert the rule -- young women burial -- barely covering their hair, a young married couple drinking in college together, two young women smoking and fashionably dressed -- all are doing something forbidden, but they all look into the camera relaxed, happy, curious. the photographer was able to move around the country freely for the most part. only in the holy city was she not allowed to take pictures. that is where she realized the power of the cleric's -- clerics. >> the thing that really impressed me and for which i was really gratef
or iran, through the mountains, and were picked up by the russians north of tehran. and for a second reason, a much smaller percentage of personnel were involved in training missions, in both iran and saudi arabia. but whereas after the end of world war ii, our 60,000 uniformed and civilian troops left the supply delivery business to russia, they left the gulf, those small number of advisors in saudi arabia and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to indi
to stop tehran from moving forward with the ambitions to build a nuclear weapon. >> coming up on the news edge. yo i would wake up and every day i would say today's the day i'm not going do it. >> a former rockette opens up about her battle with bulima. her advice to other young dancers and performers. >> that kid is five. an internet sensation. oh, my goodness. he's the real deal. he appeared on the ellen show after conspiraciy thiso rifts believed his rendition of the plight of the bumblebee. he can really play the piano. a@ . >>> holidays are drawing near. there the is a lot going on behind the scenes of the holiday show. one former dancer is opening up about her battle with bulima. >> reporter: when gretta became a radio city rockette in 2000, she thought she would finally get her life in order. >> purging up to 30 times a day and spending $100 a day on food. i became depressed. >> reporter: the lifelong dancer dreamed of becoming a rockette since she was a little girl in kansas city. when she made it to new york city, she was in the throes of an eating disorder show struggled with si
over the next four years. >> thank you. heading to tehran, this is a crucial area, of course. do i even need to ask what is being made of another four years of barack obama? and what might happen in the coming months? >> many people in iran are concerned that the republican win would mean war. simply because they think that obama will move quickly to set up a new round of talks for iranian nuclear ambitions. given the choice between them, the main question is, which one is more acceptable as the main politician. for mitt romney, officials were going to impose a cessation of activity, or president obama, with its peaceful nuclear rights to iran. i think they are happier to see barack obama in the office again. we also are seeing that the market has reacted positively and the exchange rate has dropped slightly over the last couple of hours. >> many thanks for now. thank you. let's go to moscow as well. the editor of "russian global affairs" joins us now. thank you for joining us. there has been tension in relations, certainly in the later stages of president obama's presidency. what are t
murdered in the way that americans were on 9/11, in tehran, how would you have reacted to the country that you believed had done that? >> translator: so you're saying that the country of afghanistan was at fault? was responsible? so you're seeing the responsible party as a whole nation? >> i think it is inarguable that al qaeda and osama bin laden's men who worked for him were training in afghanistan. so afghanistan was certainly knowingly harboring terrorists who were training to commit atrocities. >> translator: i believe that you can, under no circumstances, justify the condemnation and the attack upon a country in order to reach a single terrorist group, and i do believe that no matter how long you and i or other people speak, this is unexplainable. allow me to ask you. do you believe that the various administrations of the united states were successful in eradicating terrorism? they haven't been. has the problem been resolved or has it gotten worse? >> well, it's hard to say. >> translator: the approach was wrong. ed formula was wrong. >> my answer would be, clearly, it was parti
diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually gets the nuclear weapon. only diplomacy can provide a real and sustainable solution. this is no mystery to
and all the instructions they got, actually came from tehran. tehran at the end of the day is the big losener this battle because it did not succeed to bring israel down. its proxy was very badly damaged. its head was cut off. and in fact, the truce was broken by three country who is have taken over the leadership of the middle-east, of the region, away from iran who, wanted it and that's egypt, turkey and qatar. so iran is the big loser and i wouldn't be surprised that they would try and start something again. but i hope very much that they learned their lesson because the blows that hamas suffered were very, very severe. and we are on the verge of a ground incursion, which would have finished them off. the only reason we didn't do it was as a gesture to the united states, to president obama and to the egyptian president, to give peace a chance. we will give it a chance. but if the one rocket is fired at an israeli village or city, we will not stand still, i promise you. >> ambassador, where does israel stand? i heard what you just said. those are strong words. i think that everyone
, correct? >> yeah. >> all right. >> to go to tehran. >> to negotiate for the hodges. >> it had to do with tehran. it didn't have to do with day to day life in washington. >> i understand. as you see we're now two decades beyond. explain. is it worse now than it's ever been and how bad could it possibly get? >> i think it is worse. i think it's worst in large part because if we don't recognize who your enemy is, and this was written 2000 years ago, you will lose. we have not recognized the enemy to be radical islam. we've created all kinds of names for it like al-qaeda and hamas and islam i can jihad, but in fact, it is radical islam. it's not war against all muslims. it's radical islam. what we've failed to do is to define the enemy so you know how to combat it. >> how widespread do you think this is because i think it's far more widespread than people are willing to acknowledge. >> i will tell you what they're advertising for right now who are martyrs that will blow themself not in the middle east but in other countries. for example, i mean, it's easy to get in and out of venezuela
the horizon. what is it going to be the next step in getting tehran to back off on its nuclear ambitions? we saw very -- fought back and forth during the campaign about that. i don't think that president obama or prime minister netanyahu necessarily have a better relationship today than they did a month ago. but president obama was very clear in every public statement saying israel is right to defend itself. it has every right. he refused to tell them not to go in on the ground. president obama is doing nothing to let any air exist between the two of them. at least in a public sense. pete: why not say that it's a better relationship now? i noticed it was interesting that netanyahu sort of went out of his way to say he agreed to the cease-fire after consulting with president obama. >> right. president obama did urge him to take the cease-fire and there was a collaboration in that sense. i just think that there's -- you know, a lot of history of distrust there. to overcome. and it may be that this -- this happens. in the next year or two. but i think really what the obama administration is wai
. many people had been in iran but the time he went to tehran it was off-limits in the places he went and so on. what i realized is, he had been this foreign correspondent who travel to places not many people went and came back, and he was able to bring a very unique perspective and bring his, his writing, his humor, his take on these faraway lands. and then, when he became ill, he basically traveled to this land of melody as he put it almost is if you are a foreign correspondent, reporting like a foreign correspondent on this new land he had arrived in. and they'll be coming very very and having a potentially terminal disease or even having cancer as commonplace, the land he traveled to as a foreign correspondent that he became in covering, and i think it makes it a very unique perspective on this illness. >> and, he always had his wit and sometimes needed it to get out of, his brilliance to get out of difficult situations. a couple of months after september 11 he was in afghanistan, peshawar i think and he saw bin laden t-shirts on display and he wanted to buy some for his friend, s
promised by the bab. he did this in the city of baghdad, after he had been sent out of tehran, which was his home and banished to baghdad. after he declared that he was the one the bab had promised and all the religions of the past had promised, he was banished again to what was constantinople, now istanbul. he was banished still further to other places in a further attempt by the government and the clergy to eliminate the followers of bahÁ'u'llah. since his faith was growing very rapidly there was considerable concern that it was recruiting too many people and was growing too rapidly and gaining too much power. and their desire was to stamp it out. in that part of the middle east, the bahai faith was viewed as a heresy, because it came after islam. it is unfortunately often said that the bahai faith is a sect of islam. that could only be said if christianity were to be called a sect of judaism. since the bahai faith came from islam in much the same way that christianity came from judaism. so that's the derivation of the bahai faith. but the faith then spread then rapidly throughout
that are believed to keep its nuclear program afloat. yesterday the u.s. gave tehran a march deadline to begin cooperating with a u.n. nuclear investigation. the agency's been trying unsuccessfully for the past year to determine if iran is developing a nuclear weapon. >>> at the newseum in washington last night, hillary clinton offered a hint of optimism that diplomacy was still a possibility. >> we continue to believe that there is still a window of opportunity to reach some kind of resolution over iran's nuclear program. now, i'm not, you know, a wild-eye ed optimist about it, t i think it's imperative that we do everything we can unilaterally, bilaterally, multilaterally to test that proposition. >> the u.s. energy department figures show that iran's oil exports last month were down 1 million barrels a day. compared to the same time last year. >>> a scathing new report out in the uk is calling for tight restrictions on the british press in wake of last year's phone hacking scandal. after a year-long investigation, a senior british judge issued a 2,000-page report detailing what was describe
in northern syria. iranians marked the 33rd verse of the says sure of embassy in tehran with anti-american demonstrations. in 197 # >>> the militant storm that embassy and held 52 americans hostage for 444 days. they chanted death to america and burned the u.s. and israeli flags. still ahead, what we're hearing from coal country and the huge stakes in the election. first election fraud. and the tradition in one ohio community. but they say it will be differentbe this year. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile ap
.s. government in tehran since the u.s. embassy takeover in 197ed 9. >> the united states communicated to the iranians we will continue to conduct surveillance lights over international waters, over the arabian gulf. consistent with the long standing practicetant commitmencommitment to the secuf the region. >> in december, classified rq-1-70 u.s. sentinel drone crashed inside iran after losing contact with the handlers monitoring iran nuclear site. iranians recovered it largely intact. the pentagon did not disclose the details of the more recent drone incident citing the "classified" mission. meantime, more rising tension is looming farther east with china as president obama prepared for a second term. a new report suggests china is two years away from deploying nuclear ballistic missiles on the submarines. missiles with a 4600-mile range. unveiled a second sophisticated stealth fighter jet that industry experts say may have been developed with stolen u.s. technology. chinese j-31 stealth fighter has an air intake and wing dimension that is suspiciously similar to the american s-35 an3
the limit. >> so the u.s. state department has protested with protective powers in tehran since the 1979 embassy takeover. just because diplomats are protesting does not think the incident was an act of war. >> the white house has motherly feelings because of the leblgs. >> i think i have said this at least two, three, four, five times now. we don't typically comment on classified surveillance missions. i am not going to get into discussions at a classified level that occurred between this department and the white house. they were informed early on. >> that's right. if you were wondering why this happened 8 days ago but we didn't learn about it until two-days after the presidential election that's because the pentagon spokesman george little just said the drone's mission was classified. back to you in new york. >>> peter doocy, live in washington, thank you. >> this disclosure by the obama administration after the election is what charles krauthammer is talking about this morning. he was giving his take on special report last night. this is an attempt to hide the information until after
in tehran, we have the americans exactly where we want them. we are not worried about sanctions, we are going to get out of this. number 2, from an intelligence point of you, you couldn't get a better person to tell iran everything they want to know about the president, how he think, how he act, how valerie jarrett think, it is inconceivable that you would give the iranians that kind of advantage. if the administration did it, it leaves us in a very weak position. >> you know, i wish it was the only thing raising concerns in terms of our policy with iran. general, if you look around the world, you know, now that we have had a few days, we are through the election. we know we will have four more years of obama administration foreign policy. do you see anywhere in the world where we are better off or where we are viewed as a stronger, more powerful nation than we were when barack obama first took office? >> absolutely to the contrary. the fact of the matter is, when america has very strong leadership, the world is a safer and a better place. when american leadership is indecisive or p
, there is a resurgence popular call for change on the streets -- streets of tehran. lusby prepared this time differently than last time. hopefully, we can move iran in a different direction. finally, something that dennis referred to -- the potential for a surprise iranian breakup. this needs to be prevented at all costs. so far, as you have noticed, have avoided using the word legacy. remember this -- if you try to resolve all the other issues on this list or if you try to fix the israeli-palestinian conflict, for example, you may fail and people may never remember. after all, you will be the sixth president in a row to try and fail to solve the israeli- palestinian conflict. if, on your watch, i ran breaks up and achieves a nuclear weapon capability, this is what will be on your epitaph. you were the first president to be on his watch when i ran got the bomb. these are my suggestions, mr. president. i will take a vacation [laughter] thank you all very much. we will open the floor for your questions. if you can please identify to whom you're making the question and i will ask my colleagues to come up h
is in constant touch with the iranians. and actually, the people in gaza are getting their orders from tehran. i believe this is another reason to put an end to it because if hamas gets beaten, it will be a very big blow to the irappians. and make no mistake, i mean, we are not -- we are not fighting, just think of who we are fighting. this is not the sampation army. this is a band of terrorists and murderers and nobody, nobody has much sympathy for them. believe me, i saw the foreign ministers meeting yesterday in cairo. i met many of them. i know them. vispoken to them. i remember them during the last operation, coming to me and saying, go, finish the job, don't stop. they have no love lost for them. but at the moment, we do feel that we have the understanding and the support of the world. we have the support of the president of the united states, who i think has made some very, very positive statements and very constructive statements. we also have turkey, qatar and egypt, who are eager to finish this. and in fact, when you mention iran, this coalition of turkey, qatar and egypt, which could
lived in tehran in 1984. i interviewed him there after the first bus bombing in tel aviv. so here we are 18 years later and he speaking for hamas and hamas no longer an underground terror movement but the representative of the palestinian people. >> shannon: and quickly, jennifer, hamas leaders say part of the deal includes opening of all of gaza's borders but do we know if it does? >> according to a diplomatic sources that i have spoken to, the maritime blockade that israel has in effect will remain. so it's not clear how the borders really be open. it's not clear there will be any loosening of the restrictions in terms of the palestinians going in to israel. certainly the maritime blockade i'm told will remain in effect. >> shannon: jennifer live at the pentagon. thank you. >>> we're going to talk more about this mideast situation with the fox all-stars when we come back. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, and noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. a wand, some wings, soup with good thing
we hear all too often. nbc bay area stephanie tehran has more on a personal friend lost this week in a personal accident, one that could have been prevented. >> an only child but a friend to many, including me. >> she loves love. >> reporter: still figuring out her place in the world. she had just moved from her hometown of fremont to l.a. >> she had so much love to gifrks suand such a big heart. >> reporter: so full of passion and that life was cut short. as she slept in her friend's car from las vegas to l.a., they crashed into another car stopped on a highway and stalled on the road. >> i think when she woke up from the first impact and kind of panicked and maybe tried to get out of the car. >> reporter: and took off her seat belt. >> another car from behind hit at full speed. >> the damage to her brain was too much. as 27 years old erica lost her life. there were three cars involved in this accident. everybody walked away with very, very minor injuries. the difference between having a seat belt on and off, it makes the world of difference. >> reporter: according to the u.s. de
to spin in tehran. we've got to face up to what is one of the prime reasons there's the kind of unrest we're seeing. >> let me button you up the morsi thing. what should our demand be? >> stop. stop, renounce the statement and move he just made. allow the judiciary to function. if the judiciary is flawed in some way, then that's a illness that can be cured over time but to assume this kind of power is unacceptable to the united states of america. then we can outline what actions should be taken. >> chris: you already led us that direction but to the cease-fire, the very fragile cease-fire that was worked out this week between israel and hamas. how fragile is it, what do you make of it? we saw long range iranian missiles fired at tel aviv and jerusalem which raises the question, if israel takes action against iran's nuclear program what's the threat they face on the border with gaza? >> they face a significant challenge with hezbollah because of the tens of thousands of missiles in southern lebanon. i think the iranians will continue unless they see there's a price to pay. you you be state
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)

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